Tools & Techniques to Ensure Alignment of Corporate Activities and Initiatives with Overall Company Strategic Objectives

  1. Are your employees focused on driving toward your strategic objectives, day after day, week after week, quarter over quarter? Or are they focused on lesser important tactical tasks that don’t always support these strategic objectives?

  2. Can you specify which percentages of your team’s activities are spent working toward your strategic goals vs. the percent spent on tactical, non-strategic objectives?

  3. Do you have a set of tools to easily and simply track progress toward completion of strategic objectives, down to the initiative, project, and task?

  4. Do you have a set of world-class program and project management tools to leverage to ensure organizational alignment with company priorities?

If you answered “No” or I don’t know to any of the above questions, the rest of this blog is dedicated toward helping you get to “Yes” for all of the above 4 questions in 4 easy steps (my “4-in-4” delivery promise).

Develop and Prioritize Top Strategic Company Objectives

Develop and Prioritize Top Strategic Company Objectives

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STEP 1 – Develop and Prioritize Top Strategic Company Objectives

Above is a set of strategic objectives I helped develop for a financial services client who was struggling with customer loyalty and experiencing higher than standard customer defection rates to their competitors.  Through a series of interviews, workshops and visioning sessions, we arrived at the top four (4) strategic CRM objectives above and then mapped out the major customer interaction outlets (a.k.a. touch-points) in order to map the stakeholder groups that would be involved in helping my client achieve these four strategic objectives.

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to both Functional Areas and to Supporting Major Initiatives

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to both Functional Areas and to Supporting Major Initiatives

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STEP 2 – Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to both Functional Areas and to Supporting Major Initiatives

The next step in the process was to map the customer interaction outlets shown on the previous slide and then perform the following:

  • Overlay the stakeholder groups (shown on the outer part of the above diagram) that will be involved in helping achieve each of the four strategic initiatives shown in the center.

  • Map the strategic objectives that each of the stakeholder groups would be involved with implementing (i.e. bulleted items “Customer Information Profiles”, “Customer Needs Fulfillment”, etc.)

  • Develop a program and project plan with required resources from:

  1. From outside the company (consulting),

  2. From each of the stakeholder groups (subject matter experts, project liaisons, etc.)

  3. Technology Purchases

  4. Sourcing Agreements

  5. etc., etc.

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to Supporting Major Initiatives, Projects and Activities

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to Supporting Major Initiatives, Projects and Activities

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STEP 3 – Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to Supporting Major Initiatives, Projects and Activities

The next step in the process is to develop a mapping from Strategic Objectives to the Supporting Initiatives and the projects/activities that support these major initiatives. It is important to develop a unique coding system (or Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)) for each strategic objective, major supporting imitative, project and activities within each project so they can be tracked within a time management system. Here is an example as partially illustrated in the above diagram.

WBS Level 1: Strategic Objective 4 = “Correct Action, Correct Time, Correct Customer”;

    WBS Level 2: Initiative 1 Supporting Objective 4 = 4CR1 or “Customer      Referrals”

      WBS Level 3: Project 1 Supporting Customer Referrals =                  xxxxx 4CRCCIFG1, “Conduct Customer Incentive Focus Group”

          WBS Level 4: Activity 1 Supporting Conduct Customer Incentive                Focus Group = 4CRCCIFG1A1, “Determine Focus Group                                  Participants”

Once you have determined the entire work breakdown structure for all strategic initiatives, tracked to initiatives, project and all activities, down to the 4th level (i.e. 4CRCCIFG1A1), you can then load these into your time management system to track how much time is being spent on these strategic objectives & tasks vs. all other time management tasks.

Related to the above topic, does your organization need world-class and experienced assistance with any of the following?:

  • Determining your next strategic direction?

  • Setting prioritized strategic goals?

  • Driving organizational efficiency?

  • Ensuring corporate strategic initiatives are aligned with current projects, activities and tasks?

If so, give me a call, I call help you achieve world-class strategic programs that enable you to surpass your competition and bring your organization to the next level of strategic goal development and attainment.

Lastly, this is just one article of 40+ total I have written on Customer strategy, CRM, marketing, product management, competitive intelligence, corporate innovation, change management – all of which I have significant experience in delivering for Fortune 500 companies.  In fact, my blog is now followed by nearly 160,000 world-wide and was just named one of the top 100 CRM blogs on the planet by Feedspot, alongside Salesforce.com, Infor, Microsoft, SAS, etc. – Reference this informative site here: https://blog.feedspot.com/crm_blogs/

360° Organizational Health Check & Strategic Plan for the Future

Organizational Health Check & Diagnostic

Organizational Health Check & Diagnostic

Does your company encounter any of the following, yet you are unable to determine the root cause?

  • Loss of Market Share vs. Competitors

  • Eroding Profit Margins

  • Employee Churn

  • High Cost of Goods Sold (COGS)

  • Sales and Marketing Ineffectiveness

  • Data & Information Gaps or errors

  • Lower Morale

  • Declining Productivity

  • Inefficient Processes, leading to ever growing labor costs

  • Lack of automation vs. competitors

If you answered “Yes” to any of the above, then perhaps you should consider conducting an organizational health check diagnostic to determine your company’s current state across a number of corporate capabilities.  This assessment will lead to the following valuable and actionable organizational insights:

  • Key organizational gaps

  • Management strengths & weaknesses including developmental needs

  • Organizational strengths

  • Organizational aspirations for future capabilities and performance

  • A set of prioritized future state capabilities

  • A 5-year road-map for building your future state capabilities including business case and ROI for each future-state road-map initiative

Process for Organizational Diagnostic & New Strategic Plan Development

Process for Organizational Diagnostic & 5-Year Strategic Plan Development

While the organizational health check and diagnostic is very extensive and comprehensive, the overall high level process used can be distilled down to four (4) easy steps as follows:

  1. Determine Organizational Change Drivers – Through a series of Key stakeholder interviews and work-shops, determine what the top line organizational issues and change drivers are in order to use them as input into diagnosing the organization’s current state

  2. Determine Organization’s Current State Health & Capabilities – Through a series of Key stakeholder interviews and current state assessment work-shops, holistically baseline the company’s top line organizational capabilities – sales, marketing, financial practices, organization, management practices, processes, etc.

  3. Determine Organization’s Desired Future State – While interviewing key stakeholders determine gaps in the current set of holistic capabilities and determine a consensus for key future state capabilities that need to be developed, implemented and/or evolved.

  4. Develop 5Year Future State Fulfillment Road-map – Logically and systemically develop a blueprint for when and how to implement the needed capabilities of the future determined in step #3

Business Change Drivers

Per step #1 of the process, above is an example of a set of high level organizational change drivers that were cultivated through a series of executive interviews.

Organizational Capability Diagnostic Structure

In order to holistically assess an organization’s current state health and capability levels, I have developed a comprehensive and systemic diagnostic process along with structured questions and interview guides used to interview key stakeholders and to conduct assessment work-shops.

Sample Client Organizational Diagnostic Analysis Executive Summary

Sample Client Organizational Diagnostic Analysis Executive Summary

Above is a great tool I use to perform a final read-out summary of an organization’s current state health assessment. The chart is an Excel Spider Chart (Google it and how to create) and is used to benchmark an array of multi-dimensional capabilities. In this example, based on the summary of all interviews and workshops, the red line represents the summary score for seven (7) current state capability areas for a large pharmaceutical client.

The blue line is the summary consensus score for what the organization feels should be the capability levels for the future state for these same seven (7) capability areas.

A green oval represents a small gap between current and future state capability levels; a yellow represents a moderate gap; and, lastly, a red oval highlights a large or very large gap between current and future state capabilities (e.g. Financial Control, Rigor).

People & Organizational Structure Diagnostic

People & Organizational Structure Diagnostic

Above is a sample “deeper dive” into the analysis performed under the capability area “People & Organizational Structure” shown in the previous executive summary chart. In this example, we see that “Communication” and “Management Processes, Policy” have the largest capabilities gaps while “Skills” and “Organizational Structure” have the smallest capability deltas (difference between current state and desired future state).

This is just one article of 40+ I have written on Customer strategy, CRM, marketing, product management, competitive intelligence, corporate innovation, organization excellence & change management – all of which I have significant experience in delivering for Fortune 500 companies.  My blog is now followed by nearly 158,000+ world-wide and was just named one of the top 100 CRM blogs on the planet by Feedspot, alongside Salesforce.com, Infor, Microsoft, SAS, etc. – Reference this informative site here: https://blog.feedspot.com/crm_blogs/

 

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