Tools & Techniques to Ensure Alignment of Corporate Activities and Initiatives with Overall Company Strategic Objectives

  1. Are your employees focused on driving toward your strategic objectives, day after day, week after week, quarter over quarter? Or are they focused on lesser important tactical tasks that don’t always support these strategic objectives?

  2. Can you specify which percentages of your team’s activities are spent working toward your strategic goals vs. the percent spent on tactical, non-strategic objectives?

  3. Do you have a set of tools to easily and simply track progress toward completion of strategic objectives, down to the initiative, project, and task?

  4. Do you have a set of world-class program and project management tools to leverage to ensure organizational alignment with company priorities?

If you answered “No” or I don’t know to any of the above questions, the rest of this blog is dedicated toward helping you get to “Yes” for all of the above 4 questions in 4 easy steps (my “4-in-4” delivery promise).

Develop and Prioritize Top Strategic Company Objectives

Develop and Prioritize Top Strategic Company Objectives

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STEP 1 – Develop and Prioritize Top Strategic Company Objectives

Above is a set of strategic objectives I helped develop for a financial services client who was struggling with customer loyalty and experiencing higher than standard customer defection rates to their competitors.  Through a series of interviews, workshops and visioning sessions, we arrived at the top four (4) strategic CRM objectives above and then mapped out the major customer interaction outlets (a.k.a. touch-points) in order to map the stakeholder groups that would be involved in helping my client achieve these four strategic objectives.

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to both Functional Areas and to Supporting Major Initiatives

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to both Functional Areas and to Supporting Major Initiatives

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STEP 2 – Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to both Functional Areas and to Supporting Major Initiatives

The next step in the process was to map the customer interaction outlets shown on the previous slide and then perform the following:

  • Overlay the stakeholder groups (shown on the outer part of the above diagram) that will be involved in helping achieve each of the four strategic initiatives shown in the center.

  • Map the strategic objectives that each of the stakeholder groups would be involved with implementing (i.e. bulleted items “Customer Information Profiles”, “Customer Needs Fulfillment”, etc.)

  • Develop a program and project plan with required resources from:

  1. From outside the company (consulting),

  2. From each of the stakeholder groups (subject matter experts, project liaisons, etc.)

  3. Technology Purchases

  4. Sourcing Agreements

  5. etc., etc.

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to Supporting Major Initiatives, Projects and Activities

Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to Supporting Major Initiatives, Projects and Activities

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STEP 3 – Map Top Strategic Company Objectives to Supporting Major Initiatives, Projects and Activities

The next step in the process is to develop a mapping from Strategic Objectives to the Supporting Initiatives and the projects/activities that support these major initiatives. It is important to develop a unique coding system (or Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)) for each strategic objective, major supporting imitative, project and activities within each project so they can be tracked within a time management system. Here is an example as partially illustrated in the above diagram.

WBS Level 1: Strategic Objective 4 = “Correct Action, Correct Time, Correct Customer”;

    WBS Level 2: Initiative 1 Supporting Objective 4 = 4CR1 or “Customer      Referrals”

      WBS Level 3: Project 1 Supporting Customer Referrals =                  xxxxx 4CRCCIFG1, “Conduct Customer Incentive Focus Group”

          WBS Level 4: Activity 1 Supporting Conduct Customer Incentive                Focus Group = 4CRCCIFG1A1, “Determine Focus Group                                  Participants”

Once you have determined the entire work breakdown structure for all strategic initiatives, tracked to initiatives, project and all activities, down to the 4th level (i.e. 4CRCCIFG1A1), you can then load these into your time management system to track how much time is being spent on these strategic objectives & tasks vs. all other time management tasks.

Related to the above topic, does your organization need world-class and experienced assistance with any of the following?:

  • Determining your next strategic direction?

  • Setting prioritized strategic goals?

  • Driving organizational efficiency?

  • Ensuring corporate strategic initiatives are aligned with current projects, activities and tasks?

If so, give me a call, I call help you achieve world-class strategic programs that enable you to surpass your competition and bring your organization to the next level of strategic goal development and attainment.

Lastly, this is just one article of 40+ total I have written on Customer strategy, CRM, marketing, product management, competitive intelligence, corporate innovation, change management – all of which I have significant experience in delivering for Fortune 500 companies.  In fact, my blog is now followed by nearly 160,000 world-wide and was just named one of the top 100 CRM blogs on the planet by Feedspot, alongside Salesforce.com, Infor, Microsoft, SAS, etc. – Reference this informative site here: https://blog.feedspot.com/crm_blogs/

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Marketing Performance Improvement (MPI) & Sharpening the Marketing Saw for Marketing Leaders, CMOs

Continuous Marketing Process Assessment & Improvement

Continuous Marketing Process Assessment & Improvement

  1. Are you as a CxO so focused on the tasks at hand that you don’t take the time to re-group and assess what is working and not working? Likewise, are you too focused to take the time to determine what in your operations is effective and what corrective action is needed on a ongoing, consistent basis?

  2. Are you “operations bound” whereby your team members are out of bandwidth due to barely keeping up with ongoing marketing, sales, communications and PR production schedules?

  3. Do you find the company getting further and further behind competitors capabilities, effectiveness, market presence as well as sales volume?

  4. Are you behind on learning the latest capabilities and advances in digital asset management, marketing & content management artificial intelligence (AI), and how block-chain can help your effectiveness?

  5. Per question #4 do you know how these advances can improve the effectiveness in your marketing, sales, PR, communications while simultaneously increasing profitable revenue while simultaneously reducing your operating costs?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions, you are really in need of a Marketing Process Improvement (MPI) initiative and an infusion of a ‘Saw Sharpening” process. The benefit of implementing this continuous improvement process is that your company will increase the chance that it will evolve into the envy of the marketplace in terms of team leadership, capabilities and overall market effectiveness.

The remainder of this blog is a short primer and motivator in getting your company to consider becoming a ‘Saw Sharpening’ organization focused on improving profitability, market share and overall shareholder value improvement.

Marketing Capability Tier Evolution

Marketing Capability Tier Evolution

Complimentary to the first set of questions above:

  1. Have you mapped out how capable your company is in terms of marketing, customer management, sales, etc. such that you can accurately place your company into a capability level as shown in the above chart?

  2. Have you created an evolutionary road-map in order to mature your organization into a more capable and effective organization over time (i.e. lower expenses and increase profitable revenue) in order to leapfrog your competition and gain market share?

Can you accurately assess your competitor(s) capabilities such that you know where they are better than your company and in which specific areas?

Sharpening the Marketing Saw to Transform to attain Intelligent Marketing Enterprise (IME) (i.e. Capabilities, Efficiencies, Effectiveness)

Sharpening the Marketing Saw to Transform to attain Intelligent Marketing Enterprise (IME) (i.e. Capabilities, Efficiencies, Effectiveness)

The last set of questions are associated with answering whether you are aware of the entire landscape of capability improvement initiatives available to assist your company’s marketing, customer management, sales, PR and communications (refer to above chart). These questions are as follows:

  • Are you aware that business rules engine technology can help you automate your marketing campaign management process such that marketers do not have to be as manually involved (i.e. campaign set up, execution and post campaign results analysis)? This technology will save your company time and $$ by allowing your marketers to focus on all important marketing strategy vs. being ‘campaign jockeys’ and marketing production focused most of their time.

  • Are you aware that powerful and real-time analytic engines can help with channel mix optimization such that you are marketing to the most effective and cost efficient customer channel at all times?

  • Are you aware that leading Digital Asset Management (DAM) tools now have artificial intelligence baked right in as to help you manage, find and retrieve your digital assets across marketing, PR, sales, communications, etc. – all saving you time and enabling your content to be more compelling to your customers?

  • Associated with question #3, are you really aware of the benefits of Digital Asset Management (DAM) tools and how it can help you go to market more effectively and cost efficiently?

If you answered “no” to any of the above questions, then you are not performing adequate MPI or ‘saw sharpening’ to improve your performance longer-term. As an example of what you might be missing in not performing MPI and marketing saw sharpening, I laid out the benefits of adopting Digital Asset Management (DAM) tools which not only helps the marketing department, but also PR, communications, sales, etc. (Don’t read ahead and let me know if you were able to guess all 7 benefits of a Digital Asset Management (DAM) solution):

  1. Eliminates the cost of lost or misplaced digital assets. DAM virtually eliminates the costs associated with losing valuable digital assets due to the robust and highly organized digital asset repository (via a highly logical DAM taxonomy) which enables marketers to find and (re)use digital assets quickly.

  2. Reduces creative production development cycle times. DAM tools help users quickly create and re-purpose digital assets.

  3. Reduces the time to bring new campaigns to market. Marketers, sales, PR, communication, etc. are able to get campaign related digital out to various markets and customers at the ‘speed of need’.

  4. Eliminates duplication of work. The central asset repository that DAM provides greatly reduces the possibility of costly asset duplication.

  5. Improves collaboration and access to critical assets. DAM tools facilitate collaboration among marketers via a centralized control of digital assets.

  6. Ensures brand consistency and brand integrity.Ensures marketers, sales, PR, communication, etc. have access to the most up-to-date digital assets as opposed to users being allowed to select non brand compliant assets.

  7. Improves Marketing ROI: Enables marketers, sales, PR, communication, etc to use the most effective digital assets that will produce the greatest impact and ROI.

If you answered “yes” to some of my first set of questions and “no” to many of the 2nd and 3rd set of questions and missed the some of the benefits associated with DAM tools, then you are a prime candidate to infuse an MPI or marketing (or overall) saw sharpening process into your company. Based on having helped numerous Fortune 500 companies establish this continuous improvement mindset, approach and process, I suggest the following:

  1. Honestly assess whether your team feels as though your company is as capable as it needs to be – processes not too manual, error prone, ineffective, lagging as compared to competitors, wrong approach and strategy, inefficient tactics, etc.

  2. Set time aside each week for team saw sharpening activities and to discuss initiatives you need to implement to improve capabilities and overall effectiveness.

  3. Benchmark your performance in certain areas like e-mail open and click through rates, sales $$ per campaign, campaign cycle time and/or accuracy, Google ad-words performance, etc., net promoter score(s) and constantly challenge the team to improve incrementally as well as dramatically after the implementation of new capabilities.

  4. Hire an honest, impartial outside consultant to independently assess your capabilities and benchmark these capability areas against market leaders.

  5. Leverage a consultant to help you develop an evolution roadmap over 2-5 years for your company to attain market leader status including business case with investment and capability implementation plan.

Is your organization planning on launching a new brand or optimizing an existing one? If so, give me a call or e-mail me, I can help you implement a MPI or ‘Saw Sharpening’ process that would enable you to surpass your competition and bring your organization or agency to the next level of market effectiveness and excellence.

This is just one article of 42 total I have written on Customer strategy, CRM, marketing, product management, competitive intelligence, corporate innovation, organization excellence & change management – all of which I have significant experience in delivering for Fortune 500 companies.  In fact, my blog is now followed by nearly 158,000+ world-wide and was just named one of the top 100 CRM blogs on the planet by Feedspot, alongside Salesforce.com, Infor, Microsoft, SAS, etc. – Reference this informative site here: https://blog.feedspot.com/crm_blogs/

Brand Management 101 Primer for Non-Marketing/Brand Senior Executives (CEOs, COOs, CSOs, CHROs, CFOs, CIOs, etc.)

 

The Brand Process Life-Cycle

The Brand Process Life-Cycle

The Brand Process Life-Cycle

The Brand Process Life-Cycle

During my career non-brand professionals and executives have asked me privately what the brand life-cycle looks like from a 50,000 foot level (a.k.a. a simplified elevator pitch version). I finally sat down the other day to map this life-cycle process out and the above chart is the simplified (level 0) representation of this process. I am calling this my brand management primer 101 for non-brand and marketing executives (CFOs, CSOs, CHROs, CIOs, etc.). The overall process consists of four (4) major life-cycle stages as follows:

  1. Plan the Brand – Plan the brand such that both quantitative and qualitative brand goals are achieved

  2. Position the Brand – Ensure the brand is positioned well in terms of market, competitors, customers, prospects, etc.

  3. Deliver the brand promise – Deliver upon the expectations of the brand in terms of stakeholders, regulators, customers, brand interested, etc.

  4. Analyze the Brand – Determine if the brand is reaching its intended goals in #1 above

For each of the phases above, I included a sample objective (one of many) for each phase. These objectives while similar across many companies, the specifics objectives would be tailored for each individual company.  The important thing to remember with the above is that the life-cycle processes need to be constantly reviewed and enhanced over time utilizing a continuous improvement process approach and methodology.

Included in the above graphic is a sampling of analysis techniques for each lifecycle phase. When the process lifecycle details are determined, the analysis and ‘health check’ metrics would also be determined in order to continually gauge the overall progress of the brand toward a set of goals and objectives.

For those more analytically inclined and as an example, we might decide to use a time series or multivariate analysis in determining the marketing effectiveness on the brand(s) in the “Analyze the Brand” phase. On the other hand, a time series analysis would be used to help illuminate brand trends, issues and opportunities in historical data over a period of time as well as be used to predict future values based on previously observed values. For example, it can be used to illustrate the brand decline curve of defecting customers beyond the time that a brand is first launched as to predict the rate of decline into the future for use in projecting future revenues.

Brand Health Analysis Techniques

Brand Health Analysis Techniques

The chart above highlights two of the brand analysis techniques mentioned in the previous graphic, that being the Brand Pyramid (Health) Analysis (also commonly referred to as the brand funnel analysis if viewed from bottom to top) and the Brand Pyramid Conversion Analysis. This is meant as an overview, the next graphic takes a deep dive into each analysis technique. The key to the above chart are the questions to the left of each section as these a key in determining overall brand health.

Brand Pyramid (Strength) Analysis

Brand Pyramid (Strength) Analysis

The above chart illustrates the Brand Pyramid (strength) analysis and is sometimes also referred to as the brand health funnel analysis. In this consumers are queried about a set of questions regarding the brand. In order to qualify for the next level query, the consumer must have answered “yes” to ALL of the previous, lower level questions. For example, a consumer would need to “buy” the product to be able to “use” and only then would they be able to rate how well “satisfied with” they are with the brand (products/services).

In a perfect world, the pyramid would look more like a square with 100% of people going from “aware” all the up to “pay premium”, but the above represents the real life pyramid and what real brand analysis results typically look like.

Brand Pyramid Conversion Analysis

Brand Pyramid Conversion Analysis

The above brand pyramid conversion analysis measures the brand health slightly differently in that these are the conversion rates of audiences at each level of the brand pyramid.  To use an example, if 100 people were queried about the brand, a full 93.5% were aware of it. Of that 93.5%, 89.5% were familiar. Of the 89.5% that were familiar, only 83.5% (or 69.8 on previous chart) had a high opinion of the brand. This analysis reveals that, while people were familiar with the brand, many didn’t think very highly of the brand due to some negative perception that will need to be determined for root cause(s) (i.e. pricing, quality, warranty, features, etc.).

Is your organization planning on launching new brand or optimizing an existing one? If so, give me a call, I call help you achieve world-class brand programs that enable you to surpass your competition and bring your organization or agency to the next level of brand management excellence.

Lastly, this is just one article of 40 total I have written on Customer strategy, CRM, marketing, product management, competitive intelligence, corporate innovation, change management – all of which I have significant experience in delivering for Fortune 500 companies.  In fact, my blog is now followed by nearly 158,000+ world-wide and was just named one of the top 100 CRM blogs on the planet by Feedspot, alongside Salesforce.com, Infor, Microsoft, SAS, etc. – Reference this informative site here: https://blog.feedspot.com/crm_blogs/

 

Developing an Enterprise Level Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Strategy & Road-map

Enterprise CRM Strategy Development Framework

Enterprise Customer & CRM Strategy Development Framework

The chart above is a framework I have used to guide the development and future operational model of a customer relationship management (CRM) strategy and roadmap for a large multi-national company. This framework is comprised of the following major components that must be taken into account in developing a customer strategy & roadmap (from bottom to top) :

  1. Major customer segments that exist comprise the foundation of the framework. These need to be taken into consideration as the major customer stakeholders that either are in place, or need to be defined as part of the future-state strategy.

  2. The customer channel content that exists and will be needed moving forward once the major customer segments have been determined.

  3. The partner matrix and partner relationship model that exists and will be needed – types of partners, partner distribution model, partner communications methods, partner acquisition model, etc.

  4. The current and future customer touch-points specifications – usage, volume, delivery method, cost structure, etc.

  5. Major customer, partner and market insights that exist and that are needed in the future.

  6. The current and needed future state model for customer facing operations and capabilities that exist within each functional area.

  7. The existing and future engagement model that will operate through the customer channels, utilizing the information/insights and channel and customer specific content, etc. – cost structure, automation, key strategies in each (sell in service, one and done customer service, etc.)

  8. Finally the top of the pyramid, the customer and CRM strategy that drives all other structure capabilities and operating models as defined through a series of workshops shown later in this article.

graphic2

High Level Enterprise CRM Transformation Approach

The chart above is a depiction of the transformation approach I have used to guide the development of the actual CRM strategy shown on the top of the pyramid from the last chart. In this chart we have the following:

  1. Left side, “Synthesize Insights” – Depicts sample insights that need to be gathered and synthesized on the left in order to determine a realistic future state customer strategy and roadmap.

  2. Top, under “CRM Transformation Approach” – The delivery, governance and oversight structures that must oversee and manage the delivery of a final customer strategy and 5+ year roadmap.

  3. Middle, under “CRM Transformation Approach” – The major program phases in the delivery of the future state customer strategy and roadmap as well as the major goals and deliverables from each phase.

  4. Right side, under “Net Positive Impact” – The major positive impacts from the development of a customer strategy and 5+ year roadmap stated in both quantitative measures (via a business case) and qualitative dimensions.

 

CRM Opportunity Assessment Process

CRM Opportunity Assessment Process

The chart above is the high level process (level 0) I have used to assess the CRM (future-state) opportunities at a large multi-national company. While I start with this CRM process flow to accelerate the delivery of a customer strategy and roadmap, each is tailored to each client situation and set of requirements. This also includes a detailed approach and plan for conducting a series of “CRM Opportunity Assessment Workshops” attended by key executives and stakeholders whereby many of the components listed in the above flowchart are actually defined.

 “To Be”, Future-State CRM Strategy Definition

“To Be”, Future-State CRM Strategy Definition

The chart above details a small sample of the steps details that exist within the “CRM Opportunity Assessment” processes step. In this particular example, we must define the major customer strategies we want moving forward as well as the supporting details to successfully deliver the strategy:

  1. Performance metrics that will be put in place to monitor the success of the overall program once the customer/CRM strategy is implemented

  2. Budget & governance structure that will manage both the implementation of the strategy as well its ongoing operation of the program

  3. Program success criteria for the strategy to be considered a success

  4. Specific programs and projects to deliver the strategy

  5. The stated strategic goals for each defined customer strategy

CRM Strategy & Roadmap Development Process

CRM Strategy & Roadmap Development Process

The chart above is the high level process (level 0) I have used to develop a future operational model of a customer relationship management (CRM) strategy and roadmap for a large multi-national company. I full project plan that includes task dependencies, project critical path, logical sequencing of project tasks, resourcing plan, etc. accompanies the above chart during an actual client project. This also includes a detailed approach and plan for conducting a series of “CRM Definition Workshops” attended by key executives and stakeholders that provide direct input into the future-state CRM strategy & road-map.

Strategic CRM Goals Definition Process

Strategic CRM Goals Definition Process

The chart above highlights the details associated with developing the specific and measurable objectives for a future state CRM & customer strategy. These details are highly variable and need to be tailored based on the specifics associated with the client’s market & requirements, budget, competition, market/customer gaps, etc.

This is just one article of 40+ total I have written on Customer strategy, CRM, marketing, product management, competitive intelligence, corporate innovation, change management – all of which I have significant experience in delivering for Fortune 500 companies.

In fact, my blog is now followed by nearly 160,000 world-wide and was just named one of the top 100 CRM blogs on the planet by Feedspot, alongside Salesforce.com, Infor, Microsoft, SAS, etc. – Reference this informative site here: https://blog.feedspot.com/crm_blogs/

 

The Basic S4 (S**4) Building Blocks to Creating and Implementing an Effective Customer Strategy

4S - Customer Strategy Building Blocks

4S – Customer Strategy Building Blocks

 

The following blog article will succinctly and effectively answer the following questions as related to developing and deploying an effective customer strategy:

  • What are the basic building blocks of an effective customer strategy ecosystem?

  • What is the function of each process in this customer delivery ecosystem?

  • What are the critical questions that must be answered by each function in this ecosystem?

  • How can you develop an effective customer strategy that delivers maximized customer satisfaction simultaneous to maximized profitability?

  • What is the checklist to ensuring your customer strategy and delivery is effective?

The Building Blocks of the Customer Strategy Life Cycle

The Building Blocks of the Customer Strategy Life Cycle

 

Above are the basic building blocks to delivering an effective customer experience.  Each process is designed to work in an ongoing continuous ecosystem (loop) in order to deliver a personalized customer experience that matches the customer’s current and future needs, preferences, etc.

Let’s examine each process and how it supports the overall infrastructure model.

  • Segment – the analogy for the segment process is that the more and differentiated customer knowledge you have, the better you will be able separate customers into unique needs groups in order to deliver a unique experience that they truly value.

  • Separate – Once you have effectively segmented your customers and prospects into unique needs groups, you can then start to separate them in order to deliver differentiated and 1-on-1 treatments that are uniquely valuable to each of those customer segment groups.

  • Satisfy – The next step in the process is to deliver content and programs that deliver value, not only to the needs of the overall segment group, but also delivers value to every customer sub-segment within the overall segment group via program sub-segment delivery structures. This is accomplished by delivering customized 1-to-1 customer programs that effectively leverage the unique customer insights gathered (history, needs, preferences, likes, dislikes, previous pain points, etc.).

  • Stratify – The last step in this foundational process is to develop program that migrate customers from low value segments to ever increasing higher value segments. The goal of this process to increase customer’s overall spend, overall share of wallet with the company and overall loyalty and brand ‘stickiness’ such that migrating to a competitor and defecting becomes increasingly difficult. In addition, the migration of customer to higher value segments should also increase the customer’s brand advocacy ranking such that there is a correlation between higher value customer segments and their likelihood to be more likely brand super-advocates {see blog on this topic titled “Achieving Market Leadership by Effectively Managing Customer Loyalty and Advocacy ” : Achieving Market Leadership by Effectively Managing Customer Loyalty and Advocacy  }

The 4S Customer Capabilities

The 4S Customer Capabilities

 

Critical Questions Answered by Each Process in the Above Customer Delivery Ecosystem:

  • Segment – What specific data elements and insights can we leverage or collect to increase our ability to develop unique customer treatment groups.

  • Separate – Which customer groups does it make sense to develop and deliver differentiated treatment strategies based on profitability models?

  • Satisfy – What are the optimal customer treatment strategies that can simultaneously optimize customer profitability, loyalty, brand advocacy and customer growth objectives?

  • Stratify – How do we deliver a progressive and tiered customer program to differentiate ourselves vs. our competitors and grow our market share?

Summary: You might read many complex articles on what a good customer strategy should be based on, but the above basic foundational building blocks are a simple way to start thinking about your customer ecosystem and what corporate capabilities need to be put in place to deliver effective customer and market success.

Change Management Best Practices & World-Class Change Deployment Methodology

 

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Best Practice Change Management Framework

 

Any change initiative should employ a proven & world-class change management implementation framework

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Best Practice Change Management Project Approach & Plan – Define Goals, Obtain Buy-In

Change Management Methodology: Any change initiative should employ a proven & world-class change management implementation framework. Best Practice Steps to Define Change Goals and Obtain Buy-In for the Change

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Best Practice Change Management Project Approach & Plan – Design Change Approach

Change Management Methodology: Best Practice Steps to Designing a Solid Change Approach

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Best Practice Change Management Project Approach & Plan – Develop and Deploy Change

Change Management Methodology: Best Practice Steps to Developing and Deploying Change

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Best Practice Change Management Project Approach & Plan – Deliver Change Results

Change Management Methodology: Best Practice Steps to Delivering Change Results

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Management’s Crucial Role In Supporting Change

Management Must Have Clearly Articulated Roles in Facilitating and Supporting any Change

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Organizational Change Alignment Possible Outcomes

The graphic above depicts the various change outcomes possible. Following a solid change methodology can ensure the optimal state of “total alignment”

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Change Initiative Ranking Analysis Techniques

A best practice change approach includes proven methods and techniques to evaluate potential change initiatives to undertake

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Typical & Critical Change Initiative Roles & Organizational Structure

A world-class change approach includes mapping out change roles and delivering sufficient training and role change orchestration. This approach ensures that aspect of the organization is pulling together in synergy on every level following the implementation of the change.

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Change Management Initiative Resource Plan

A world-class change approach includes mapping out a change implementation organization including the organizational inter-relationships, special committees and groups as well as specific roles and responsibilities.

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The Role of Middle Management in Change Management

A world-class change approach must include middle management inclusion strategies

slide12

Managing & Mitigating Organizational Change Resistance

Careful Considerations must be made to anticipate and mitigate change resistance, including from middle management

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Executive Support for Change Management

A world-class change approach includes planning how executive support will be applied during any change initiative

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Change Management Strategies for Institutionalizing Change

Best practice change methodologies and strategies can mitigate the pitfalls associated with not institutionalizing a change which risks, over time, organizational drift away from the desired change state.

Customer Emotions that Drive Buying Behavior

Find out why most companies miss the mark in terms of focusing on generating positive customer emotions

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Solutions to Problems AND Good Customer Emotions Need to Exist for Long-Term Loyalty

Good products and services are only part of the equation in terms of generating customer repeat business, loyalty, long-term retention

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Some Customers Will Work to Destroy Your Business While Others Are Willing Partners in Helping You Grow, Be More Successful

Some customers will actually work to kill your company and brand(s), namely dissenters and defectors, while others will work tirelessly to bolster your sales, reputation, customer acquisition efforts, etc.

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Guidelines for Generating Positive Customer Emotions and Relations

It is essential that all of your customer facing team members are representing the company and brand well, and that they adhere to your stated customer principles

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Sample Steps to Developing an Environment Where Customers Are Motivated to Buy from Your Company

Your customer facing team members need to develop a customer interaction playbook that is consistent with your brand and customer mantra

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Alignment of the customer delivery ‘value chain’ is Crucial

Every aspect of your customer delivery ‘value chain’ needs to be synchronized to deliver a highly consistent and high quality (emotional) experience as rated by your customers

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A Chief Customer Officer’s (CCO) role is to Advocate for the Customer within the CxO suite

** Refer to previous blog article on the 5 R’s of customer loyalty – https://goo.gl/L4IA3q

If you rate customer satisfaction and loyalty as a high company priority, then they must be represented by a Chief Customer Officer (CCO) that will truly advocate for customers and set the customer standards that drive positive customer emotions

Summary:  The following points summarize the content of this blog as follows:

  • In order to develop customer loyalty you must have both great products and services as well as the ability to generate positive customer emotions (customer delight, feeling connected to the company)

  • Segments of your customer base will work to destroy your attempt at market success while others are your partners in helping your company become even more successful.

  • In order to drive positive customer emotions and convert your customers into advocates and super-advocates, you must develop an internal customer relations playbook (develop customer vision, code of customer interaction conduct, etc.)

  • Every aspect of your customer delivery ‘value chain’ needs to be in-synch in order to deliver an end-to-end superb and fulfilling customer experience

  • Every company should have the equivalent of a Chief Customer Officer (CCO) in order to set the customer vision and standards and be the ultimate advocate for all of your customers.

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